In Sanskrit ashoka tree has fourteen names; Sita-ashoka, anganapriya, ashopalava, ashoka, asupala, apashaka,
hemapushpa, kankeli, madhupushpa, pindapushpa, pindipushpa
, vanjula, vishoka and vichitra.

Sita is white not red like the ashoka tree called white because of a legend.


sitAbhra
m. a white cloud MBh. ; m. n. camphor Ka1v.

sitadvija
m. `" white bird "' , a goose Subh.

sitAGga
m. a kind of plant ib. ; camphor ib. ; N. of S3iva ib. (printed %{mit-}) ; %{-rAga} m. a white cosmetic. or pigment for the limbs or body Kum.

sitAhvaya
m. `" white-named "' , the planet Venus (cf. %{zukra}) VarBr2S. ; N. of various plants (= %{zveta-rohita} ; = %{zveta-zigru} , a whñwhite-
blossomed Tulasi1) L.

Yakshis under the ashoka tree were also important in early Buddhist monuments as a decorative element and are found in many ancient
Buddhist archaeological sites. With the passing of the centuries the yakshi under the ashoka tree became a standard decorative element of
Hindu Indian sculpture and was integrated into Indian temple architecture as
sala-bhanjika, because there is often a confusion between the
ashoka tree and the sal tree (Shorea robusta) in the ancient literature of the Indian subcontinent.

In Hinduism the ashoka is considered a sacred tree. Not counting a multitude of local traditions connected to it, the ashoka tree is worshipped
in Chaitra, a month of the Hindu calendar. It is also associated with Kamadeva, the Hindu god of love, who included an ashoka blossom
among the five flowers in his quiver, where ashoka represent seductive hypnosis. Hence, the ashoka tree is often mentioned in classical
Indian religious and amorous poetry, having at least 16 different names in Sanskrit referring to the tree or its flowers.
In Mahākāvya, or Indian epic poetry, the ashoka tree is mentioned in the Ramayana in reference to the Ashoka Vatika (garden of ashoka
trees) where Hanuman first meets
Sita.

Queen Māyā giving birth to the Buddha under the Asoka tree.
arkacikitsA
f. Arka's (see %{arka} m. at end) , `" medical art "' i.e. work on medicine.

arkaprakAza
mf(%{A})n. bright like the sun MBh. ii 313 m. N. of a medical work (cf. %{-cikitA}
above) , of a work on jurisprudence
arka
m. ( %{arc}) , Ved. a ray , flash of lightning RV. &c. ; the sun RV. &c. ; (hence) the
number , twelve "' Su1ryas. ; Sunday ; fire RV. ix , 50 , 4 S3Br. Br2A1rUp. ; crystal
R. ii , 94 , 6 ; membrum viriIe AV. vi , 72 , 1 ; copper L. ; the plant Calotropis
Gigantea (the larger leaves are used for sacrificial ceremonies ; cf. %{arka-kozI} ,
%{-parNa4} , %{palaza4} , &c. below) S3Br. &c. , a religious ceremony S3Br.
Br2A1rUp.
arkasoka
m. the heat of rays RV. vi , 4 , 7.
Asoka
zoka
mfn. ( %{zuc}) burning , hot AV. ; (%{zo4ka}) m. (ifc. f. %{A}) flame , glow , heat
RV. AV. S3Br. ; sorrow , affliction , anguish , pain , trouble , grief for (gen. or
comp.) RV. &c. &c. ; Sorrow personified (as a son of Death or of Dron2a and
Abhimati) Pur. ; (%{I}) f. see below.
zokabhaGga
m. `" sñsorrow-break "' , dissipation or removal of grief MW.

azoka
1 mf(%{A})n. (1. %{zuc}) , not causing sorrowN. Lalit. ; not feeling sorrow Nalo7d. ;
m. the tree Jonesia Asoka Roxb. (a tree of moderate size belonging to the
leguminous class with magnificent red flowers) MBh. &c. ; N. of a minister of king
Das3aratha R. i , 7 , 3 ; of a well-known king (in Pa1t2aliputra) MBh. Buddh. &c. ;
(%{A}) f. N. of a medicinal plant L. ; a female name , (g. %{zubhrA7di} q.v.) ; N. of
one of the female deities of the Jainas L. ; (%{am}) n. the blossom of the As3oka
plant Vikr. , (cf. Pa1n2. 4-3 , 166 Siddh.) ; quicksilver L.
2
azoka
2 mfn. (3. %{zuc}) , without heat S3Br. xiv.
zukti
f. (prob. fr. 1. %{zuc} and orig. `" shining , bright "') a pearl-oyster or oyster shell
(eight sources of pearls are enumerated by Sch. on Kir. xii , 40 , viz. clouds ,
elephants , fish , serpents , bamboos , conchshells , boars , and oyster shells)
Kaus3. Ka1v. &c. ; a small shell or cockle L. ; a portion of a skull (used as a cup
&c.) W. ; a bone BhP. ; Tamarindus Indica L. ; Unguis Odoratus L. ; any perfume or
fragrant substance R. ; a curl or feather on a horse's neck or breast S3is3. ; a
measure of weight (= 1/2 Pala or 4 Karshas) S3a1rn3gS. ; a partic. disease of the
cornea Sus3r. ;
Piles ; m. N. of an A1n3girasa Pan5cavBr. ; of a mountain Ma1rkP.
(w.r. %{sukti}) ; pl. N. of a people VarBr2S.

azokarohiNI
f. N. of a medicinal plant Sus3r.
azokaSaSThI
f. the sixth day in the first half of the month Caitra BhavP. ii.
azokASTamI
f. the eighth day in the first half of the month Caitra.
aSTAGga
mf(%{A})n. consisting of eight parts or members (as medical science [MBh. ii , 224
and 442] or a kingdom [MBh. xv , 177] &c.) ; (in comp.) the eight parts (as of an
army [MBh. ii , 197] ;
(otl) Tamil
pallavattiru
asoka tree
Here the Tamil name is a loan word of phal as in phalgun.
(mwd)
piNDapuSya
m. (L) Jonesia Asoka ; the China rose ; the pomegranate tree ; n. (L.) the flower of
JñJonesia Añsoka ; of the ChñChina rñrose ; of Tibernaemonsana Coronaria ; of a
lotus.
16
(otl)
piNTi
04 asoka tree
According to the Hindu epic ( 'ithihasa') Ramayana, Sita Devi had sit under an Ashoka tree while at Lanka and till the end of Rama - Ravana
war, Sita Devi remained there itself  under the tree. The place was called 'Ashokavani', 'vani' means garden.

That is why Ashoka tree is considered to be sacred. It is also believed that the tree bowed its branches to show its respect towards Sita Devi.
That may be the reason behind the slightly bent shape of its branches. Now this place is believed to be in modern day Sri Lanka.
Arka , Aditya ,Ravi is the plant Calotropis Gigantea


Calotropis yields a durable fiber (commercially known as bowstring of India) useful for ropes, carpets, fishing nets, and sewing
thread. Floss, obtained from seeds, is used for stuffing purposes. Fermented mixture of Calotropis and salt is used to remove the
hair from goat skins for production of "nari leather" and of sheep skins to make leather which is much used for inexpensive book
binding.[5][full citation needed] Fungicidal and insecticidal properties of Calotropis have been reported.
Calotropis is a poisonous plant. The active principles are uscharin, calotoxin, calactin, and calotropin.[citation needed] The leaves
and stem when incised yield thick milky juice. It is used as an arrow poison, cattle poison (see also Sutari), rarely for suicide and
homicide and mostly an accidental poison.
The milky latex sap of Calotropis gigantea is a known cause of toxic keratoconjunctivitis and reversible vision loss. Crownflower
keratitis is a rare condition and is usually the result of accidental ocular exposure to the sap. During the process of making a
Hawaiian lei flower necklace, touching the sap and then touching the ocular surface may result in crownflower keratitis. Damage
(poisoning) of the cornea endothelium results in corneal stromal edema and decreased visual acuity. Although there is some
permanent damage to the corneal endothelium with decreased endothelial cell count and irregular shape, the remaining corneal
endothelial cells usually recover with complete resolution of the corneal edema and a return to normal visual acuity. The condition
is usually self-limited and resolves faster with topical steroids. The clinical course of this condition suggests that Calotropis is
paradoxically relatively nontoxic to corneal epithelium and highly toxic to corneal endothelium. The painless clinical course may be
related to anesthetic properties of Calotropis latex and relatively minor epithelial injury.[12][13][14]

In the Paushya chapter of the Adi Parva portion of the Indian epic Mahabharata, a disciple of the rishi Ayoda-Daumya named
Upamanya goes blind by eating the leaves of the plant which in Sanskrit is called "Arka".
Calotropis is recognized as a poisonous plant in India and South Asia. The active principles are uscharin, calotoxin, calactin, and
calotropin.The leaves and stem when incised yield thick milky juice. It is used as an arrow poison, cattle poison, rarely for suicide
and homicide and mostly an accidental poison.

                               Terminalia Arjuna



In the Ashtānga Hridayam and in many ancient Indian vedas, and was a known practice for thousands of years, passed down
by tradition, before vagbhata mentioned it in his writings. Vagbhata mentions arjuna in the treatment of wounds, hemorrhages
and ulcers, applied topically as a powder. Arjuna is an excellent medicine for Heart, it has the capability to even reverse heart
failure.   The Arjuna plant (lat. Terminalia Arjuna) has traditionally been used to treat heart disease for centuries, which is why
it got the nickname “Guardian of the heart.” It’s named after the hero of the famous epic “Mahabharata”, because of its
protective effects. Arjuna is an evergreen tree of the Combretaceae family, which grows along the rivers of West Bengal in the
drained beds of central and southern India. In Ayurveda,it’s considered a sacred plant.

Recent studies in rat model have shown its preventive potential in monocrotaline induced pulmonary artery hypertension. It
prevents rise in right ventricular systolic pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, % medial wall thickness, echo-cardiographic
changes through inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS)Reactive_oxygen_species mediated pulmonary vascular
remodeling. It has also been identified to inhibit NADPH oxidase (NOX1)NADPH_oxidase in lung homogenate.

dvAdazAditya        (in comp.) the 12 A1dityas ;

deva      
%{vi4zve@devA4s} , all the gods RV. ii , 3 , 4 &c. , or a partic. class of deities [see under %{vi4zva}] , often reckoned as 33 ,
either 11 for each of the 3 worlds RV. i , 139 , 11 &c. [cf. %{tri-daza}] , or 8 Vasus , 11 Rudras , and
12 A1dityas [to which the 2 As3vins
must be added] Br.
devajUti        (%{de-}!) m. N. of an A1ditya TS.
vasu        excellent , good , beneficent RV. Gr2S3rS. ; sweet L. ; dry L. ;
N. of the gods (as the `" good or bright ones , esp. of the
A1dityas , Maruts , As3vins , Indra , Ushas , Rudra , Va1yu , Vishn2u , S3iva ,
and Kubera) RV. AV. MBh. R. ; of a partic. class of gods (whose number is usually eight , and whose chief is Indra , later Agni and
Vishn2u ; they form one of the nine Gan2as or classes enumerated under Gan2a-devata1 q.v. ;

dvAdazapattraka        n. N. of a Yoga or partic. religious observance in which the 12 syllables
%{oM@namo@bhagavate@vAsu-devAya} are connected with the 12 signs of the zodiac and with the 12 months Va1mP.

bhaga        m. (ifc. f. %{A} and %{I} g. %{bahv-Adi}) `" dispenser "' , gracious lord , patron (applied to gods , esp. to Savitr2i) RV. AV. ;
N. of an
A1ditya (bestowing wealth and presiding over love and marriage , brother of the Dawn , regent of the Nakshatra Uttara-
Phalguni1 ; Ya1ska enumerates him among the divinities of the highest sphere ; according to a later legend his eyes were destroyed by
Rudra) ib. &c. &c. [743,3] ; the Nakshatra UñUttara-PhñPhalguni1 MBh. vi ,

Iza        m. lord in lord in heaven pl. N. of the A1dityas , Vasu and Rudra Hcat. i , 6. (For other comp. see under %{diva4s} , %{divA} , 2.
%{divi4} , %{divo} 3. %{dyu4}.)

Iza are the horses of the sun same as Indra's horse's

sUrya        m. the sun or its deity he moves through the sky in a chariot drawn by seven ruddy horses or mares [see %{saptA7zva} , %
{harit} , %{harid-azva}] ; in the later mythology Su1rya is identified with Savitr2i as one of the 12 A1dityas or emblems of the Sun in the
12 months of the year , and his seven-horsed chariot is said to be driven by Arun2a or the Dawn as its charioteer , who is represented
without legs ; the Sun , whether named Su1rya or Vivasvat , has several wives see %{sUryA} below) RV. &c. &c. (cf. IW. 11 ; 16 &c.
RTL. 341) a symbolical expression for the number `" twelve "' (in allusion to the sun in the 12 signs of the zodiac) Jyot. Hcat. ; the
swallow-wort (either Calotropis or Asclepias Gigantea , =
%{arka}) L.

The prefix or suffix Ark has medical science meanings, just as the plant Arka is a well known poisinious plant  'Calotropis
Gigantea' in the word arkasoka or ark the cause of zuc pain and sorrow from blindness.

ark-
asoka   m. the heat of rays RV. vi , 4 , 7.
zoka
mfn. ( %{zuc}) burning , hot AV. ; (%{zo4ka}) m. (ifc. f. %{A}) flame , glow , heat RV. AV. S3Br. ; sorrow , affliction , anguish , pain
azoka  1 mf(%{A})n. (1. %{zuc}) , not causing sorrowN. Lalit. ;
not feeling sorrow Nalo7d. ; m. the tree Jonesia Asoka Roxb.

arkacikitsA     f. Arka's (see %{arka} m. at end) ,
`" medical art "' i.e. work on medicine.

arkaprakAza   N. of a medical work (cf. %{-cikitA} above) , of a work on jurisprudence.

samaz-arkara
mfn. containing the same quantity of sugar ; n. (with %{cUrNa}) a partic. medicinal preparation Bhpr.
azoka
1 mf(%{A})n. (1. %{zuc}) , not causing sorrowN. Lalit. ; not feeling sorrow Nalo7d. ; m. the tree Jonesia Asoka Roxb.

arjunAbhra
n. N. of a medicament.
arjuna = phalguna
mfn. (cf. %{Rjra4} and %{raj}) white , clear (the colour of the day RV. vi , 9 , 1 ; of the dawn RV
In the Ashtānga Hridayam, but was also mentioned in many ancient Indian vedas, and was a known practice for thousands of years, passed down by
tradition, before vagbhata mentioned it in his writings. Vagbhata mentions arjuna in the treatment of wounds, hemorrhages and ulcers, applied
topically as a powder. Arjuna is an excellent medicine for Heart, it has the capability to even reverse heart failure.[7][8][9] The Arjuna plant (lat.
Terminalia Arjuna) has traditionally been used to treat heart disease for centuries, which is why it got the nickname “Guardian of the heart.” It’s
named after the hero of the famous epic “Mahabharata”, because of its protective effects. Arjuna is an evergreen tree of the Combretaceae family,
which grows along the rivers of West Bengal in the drained beds of central and southern India. In Ayurveda,it’s considered a sacred plant.
Surya has the seven-horsed
chariot  said to be driven by Aruna
or the Dawn as its charioteer. To
the left Aruna; red is a Retti or a
jewellers weight associated with a
Karsa as 80 Ritti's equals 16
Mashas the Indus binary standard
of 0.856 x 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32 and 64,
the largest weight to the left is
136.96 or 0.856 x 16 = 13.696, all
the weights to the right are Indus
standards x10.
80 Ritti / 12.5 (125/10) = 6.4 or
64/10= 6.4, while the larger
standard of 5000 grams (origin of
the gram) exactly match's 5000/365
(days in a year)=13.696.

nAkSatra        mf(%{I})n. relating to
the Nakshatras , starry , sidereal
La1t2y. Var. &c. ; m. astronomer ,
astrologer MBh. ; n. a month
computed by the moon's passage
through the
27 mansions , or of 30
days of 60 Ghat2i1s each W.

To the right the weight's 121 to 133
is 12 x 0.856 as a deference the 12
solar year, from 133 to 160 (160
the highest weight)is 27 or 27 lunar
mansions.
One poisonous seed that is widely referred to in ancient Indian texts on weights is the black and red
seed (gunja) of the wild lico-rice plant (Abrus Precatorius) (Marshall 1931;  Mainkar 1984). Since the
actual weight of these grains varies depending on where they are grown and or the amount of water
they receive, it is difficult to determine which of them was based to define the original Indus weight
system. Regardless of what the base weight was , the systen developed by theEarly Harappans
became widely adopted during the Harappan Period. The quote above taken from (The Archaeology
of Measurement: Comprehending Heaven, Earth and Time) J. Mark Kenoyer.

The ideal weight of the Indus was 0.856, eight seed of Abrus precatorius 8 / 0.856 = 0.107 is the
Indus standard