1. Rishabha
2. Ajita
3. Sambhava
4. Abhinandana
5. Sumati
6. Padmaprabha
7. Supaarshva
8. Chandraprabha
9. Pushpadanta
10. Shitalnatha
11. Shreyaamsha
12. Vaasupujya
13. Vimala
14. Ananta
15. Dharma
16. Shanti
17. Kuntha
18. Aara
19. Mallinaatha
20. Munisuvrata
21. Nami
22. Nemi
23. Paarshvanath
24. Mahavira
1.Bharata, son of Tirthankara
Rishabhanatha
2.Sagara, ancestor of Bhagiratha as in
the Puranas
3.Maghava[4]
4.Sanatkumara
5.Tirthankara Shantinatha
6.Tirthankara Kunthunatha
7.Tirthankara Aranatha
8.Subhauma[5]
9.Padmanabha
10.Harishena
11.Jayasena
12.Brahmadatt
The fourth Cakravartin in Jainism is Shantinath same story as Sibi the sixth Hindu Cakravartin the inference made that the pigion represents the Jains and the
hawk is the Hindu from the subject matter of both historys, in his renunciation he fasted and gave his flesh.
On the Earth, King Meghrath was sitting in his court surrounded by his courtiers. At that time a pigeon flew in through an open window and started circling inside
the hall. To the king's surprise, it landed on his lap. The king realized that the pigeon had come there out of fear.
At that very instant, a hawk flew into the king’s court too. He said to the king, "This pigeon is my prey." The king was struck with a wonder to hear a bird speak.
However, he replied, "It is true that this pigeon is your prey, but I can give you some other food."
Later on, the soul of King Meghrath became the sixteenth Tirthankar, Shäntinäth.

Shibi: The son of the Chandravanshi King Ushinara, the grandson of King Yayati and the Aila King of the Bhojas. His mother was the beautiful princess Madhavi,
the daughter of Yayati. Shibi conquered the world by military force, performed many Ashwamedha Yagnas, performed charity and upheld Dharma. He was most
famous for sacrificing his own flesh to save a pigeon from a hawk, who turned out to be the gods. The gods restored Shibi to his original form. Shibi later used his
power to force Yayati back to heavens when the latter exhausted his religious merit.
Chakravartin (Sanskrit cakravartin, Pali
cakkavattin) is an ancient Indian term used
to refer to an ideal universal ruler who rules
ethically and benevolently over the entire
world. Such a ruler's reign is called
sarvabhauma. It is a bahuvrīhi, figuratively
meaning "whose wheels are moving", in the
sense of "whose chariot is rolling
everywhere without obstruction". It can also
be analysed as an 'instrumental bahuvrīhi:
"through whom the wheel is moving" in the
meaning of "through whom the
Dharmachakra ("Wheel of the Dharma) is
turning" (most commonly used in Buddhism
and Hinduism).
Prithu: The son of Vena and the first
Samrat Chakravartin, under whom the
whole earth flourished.

Ambarisha: The son of the
Suryavanshi King Nabhaga and King
of Ayodhya.

Nahusha: The son of the
Chandravanshi King Ayu and the Aila
King of Pratishthana.

Rajingaya "Raji": The son of the
Chandravanshi King Ayu and the
younger brother of Nahusha.

Yayati: The son of the Chandravanshi
King Nahusha and the Aila King of
Pratishthana.

Shibi: The son of the Chandravanshi
King Ushinara, the grandson of King
Yayati and the Aila King of the Bhojas.

Dashagriva a.k.a Lankeshwar Ravana:

Marutta: The son of the Suryavanshi
King Avikshit and the Ikshvaku King of
Vaishali.
Azrama ; Name of a pupil of
Prithvi-dhara. a hermitage , the
abode of ascetics , the cell of a
hermit or of retired saints or
sages Mn. R. Das3. Ragh.
Megh. &c. ; a stage in the life of
a Bra1hman (of which there are
four corresponding to four
different periods or conditions ,
viz. 1st , Brahmaca1rin , `"
student of the Veda "' ; 2nd ,
Gr2iha-stha , `" householder "' ;
3rd , Va1naprastha , `"
anchorite "' ; and 4th ,
Sam2nya1sin , `" abandoner of
all worldly concerns "' , ; m. N. of
a pupil of Pr2ithvi1-dhara.

araNya ; disciple of
Prithvi-dhara. (fr. 1. %{a4raNa} ;
fr. %{R} Un2.) , a foreign or
distant land RV. i , 163 , 11 and
vi , 24 , 10 ; a wilderness ,
desert , forest AV. VS. &c. ; m.
the tree also called Kat2phala L.
; N. of a son of the Manu
Raivata Hariv. 434 ; of a
Sa1dhya ib. 11536 ; of a
teacher (disciple of
Pr2ithvidhara).
pRthI m. (nom. %{-thI} dat. %{-thyai} or
%{-thaye} gen. %{-thyAs}) N. of a
mythical personage with the patr.
Vainya (said to have been the first
anointed sovereign of men , to have
ruled also the lower animals , and to
have introduced the arts of husbandry
into the world ; he is enumerated
among the R2ishis and said to be the
author of RV. x , 148) RV. AV. Br. (cf.
%{pRthi} , %{pRthu} ; %{pArtha}).  
In the beginning, there was water
everywhere and the Brahman slept on
this water in the form of Vishnu. Since
water is called nara and since ayana
means a bed, Vishnu is known as
Narayana. In the water there emerged
a golden egg. Brahma was born inside
this egg. Since he created himself, he
is called Svayambhu, born (bhu) by
himself (svayam). For one whole year,
Brahma lived inside the egg. He then
split the egg into two and created
heaven and the earth from the two
parts of the egg. Skies, directions,
time, language and senses were
created in both heaven and earth.
From the powers of his mind, Brahma
gave birth to seven great sages. Their
names were Marichi, Atri, Angira,
Pulastya, Pulaha, Kratu and
Vashishtha. Brahma also created the
god Rudra and the sage Sanatkumara.
The Indus elephant with snake tail, both have the same name "Naga" as
Nagna 'naked'  the parasol of the seventh Arat the cobra.
The fish Pisces with two lines from the bird of Cassiopeia thus the first hour right
above Pisces. Same signs as the
Indus elephant to the left.
matsya m. (cf. %{matsa} and %{maccha}) a fish RV. &c. &c. (personified as a prince with
the patr. %{sAmmada} S3Br.) ; a partic. species of fñfish L. ; (in astron.) the figure of a
fñfigure (= %{timi}) Su1ryas. ; a partic. luminous appearance VarBr2S. ; (du.) the 12th sign
of the zodiac (Pisces) Jyot. ; a partic. figure (= %{
svastikamadhyA7kRti}) Hcat. ;
Sesha is a celebrated mythological thousand-headed serpent regarded as the emblem of eternity
(whence he is also called An-anta "' , the infinite "' ; in the Vishn2u-Pura1n2a he and the serpents
Va1suki and Takshaka are described as sons of Kadru , but in one place S3esha alone is called
king of the Na1gas or snakes inhabiting Pa1ta1la , while elsewhere Va1suki also is described as
king of the Nagas and Takshaka of the serpents ; the thousand headed S3esha is sometimes
represented as forming the couch and canopy of Vishn2u whilst sleeping during the intervals of
creation , sometimes as supporting the seven Pa1ta1las with the seven regions above them and
therefore the entire world [1089,1] ; he is said to have taught astronomy to Garga.
bhogavat mfn. (for 2. see col. 3) furnished with windings or curves or rings , ringed , coiled (as a
serpent) R. ;
furnished with a hood (cf. %{mahA-bh-}) ; a serpent or sñserpent-demon Suparn2. ;
(%{atI}) f. a sñserpent-nymph MBh. ;
N. of one of the Ma1tr2is attending on Skanda ib. ; the city of the
sñserpent-demons in the subterranean regions ib. R. Hariv. RTL. 322 (also %{-gA-vatI} L.) ; the sacred
river of the sñserpent-demons (or a Tirtha in that river sacred to the sñserpent-king Va1suki) MBh.
. Rishabha                                                           Bharata
2. Ajita                                                                 Sagara
3. Sambhava             19 Mallinatha                     Maghva
4. Abhinandana        20. Munisu-vrata                Sanatkumara
5. Sumati                  21 Nami                              Shantinatha
6. Padmaprabha      22 Nemi                               Kuntha
7. Supaarshva          23. Paarshvanath               Ara
8. Chandraprabha
9. Pushpadanta

16. Shanti
17. Kuntha
18. Aara
19. Mallinaatha
20. Munisuvrata
21. Nami
22. Nemi
23. Paarshvanath
24. Mahavira
According to the Jain texts, Kamadeva is
not a deity but a characteristic of person
related to attractivense. There are a total
of 24 Kamadevas in each cycle of Jain
Cosmology, and current cycle
Kamadevas were Bahubali,
Prajapati,
Sridhara,
Prasenachandra,
Chandravarna,
Agniyukta,

Sanatkumara,
Vatsaraja,                                                   
Kanakaprabha,
Meghaprabha,
Shantinatha,
Kunthunatha,

Arahanatha,
Vijayaraja,
Srichandra,
Nalaraja,
Hanuman,
Baliraja,
Vasudeva,

Pradyumna,
Nagakumata,
Jivamdhara
Jambusvami.
In order of their appearance, the names, signs, and colours of the Jinas of this age are (1) Rishabhanatha (“Lord Bull”), or Adinatha
(“Lord First”), his emblem the bull, his colour golden; (2) Ajita (“Invincible One”), elephant, golden; (3) Shambhava (“Auspicious”),
horse, golden; (4) Abhinandana (“Worship”), ape, golden; (5) Sumati (“Wise”), heron, golden; (6) Padmaprabha (“Lotus-Bright”), lotus,
red; (7) Suparshva (“Good-Sided”), the swastika symbol, golden; (8) Candraprabha (“Moon-Bright”), moon, white; (9) Suvidhi, or
Pushpadanta (“Religious Duties” or “Blossom-Toothed”), dolphin or makara (sea dragon), white; (10) Shitala (“Coolness”), the shrivatsa
symbol, golden; (11) Shreyamsha (“Good”), rhinoceros, golden; (12) Vasupujya (“Worshiped with Offerings of Possessions”), buffalo,
red; (13) Vimala (“Clear”), boar, golden; (14) Ananta (“Endless”), hawk (according to the Digambara sect, ram or bear), golden; (15)
Dharma (“Duty”), thunderbolt, golden; (16) Shanti (“Peace”), antelope or deer, golden; (17) Kunthu (meaning uncertain), goat, golden;
(18) Ara (a division of time), the nandyavarta (an elaborated swastika; according to the Digambara sect, fish), golden; (19) Malli
(“Wrestler”), water jug, blue; (20) Suvrata, or Munisuvrata (“Of Good Vows”), tortoise, black; (21) Nami (“Bowing Down”), or Nimin (“Eye-
Winking”), blue lotus, golden; (22) Nemi, or Arishtanemi (“The Rim of Whose Wheel Is Unhurt”), conch shell, black; (23) Parshvanatha
(“Lord Serpent”), snake, green; (24) Vardhamana (“Prospering”), later called Mahavira (“Great Hero”), lion, golden.
Padmaprabha (sun),
Chandrprabha (moon),
Vasupujya (Mangala),
Mallinatha (Budha),
Mahavira (guru),
Pushpadnatha (shukra),
Munisuvratha (Saturn),
Neminatha (Rahu)
Parshwanatha (Mula, for
Kethu ?)
sunday = sun
Monday = Moon
Tuesday = Mardi = Mars
Wednesday = Mercredi = Mercury
Thursday = Jupiter
friday  =      Venus
Saturday = Saturn
2nd Ajita same time as
Sagara.

20th Munisu-vrata is in the
time of Yayati as is Rama.

Sibi / Shantinatha is the
16th prior to Yayati yet
grandson of Yayati?
He gazed at them in fury and all but
four of the sons were burnt to ashes.
The four sons who were saved were
named Varhiketu, Suketu, Dharmaketu
and Panchajana.

The Brahma Purana is slightly
confused here. Was Panchajana
Keshini’ son or
Sumati’s son? There is
some inconsistency with the account
given in the Mahabharata. In the
Mahabharata, it is Keshini who gave
birth to sixty thousand sons and it is
Sumati who had a single on named
Asmanja. Also in the Mahabharata, all
sixty thousand sons were burnt to
ashes.

The Brahma Purana also tells us that
the sacrificial horse was obtained by
Sagara from the ocean. That is the
reason why the ocean is referred to as
sagara/

To come back to the account given in
the Brahma Purana, Panchajana’s son
Amshumana and Amshumana’s son
was Dilipa. Dilipa had a son named
Bhagiratha. Bhagiratha brought down
the river Ganga from heaven to earth
and thus redeemed his ancestors who
had been burnt to ashes by Kapila. It
was because of this that the river
Ganga came to be known as
Bhagirathi.

From Bhagiratha was descended
Raghu. Raghu’s son was Aja. Aja’s son
Dasharatha and Dasharatha’s son
Rama.
six generations from Sagara is
Rama
To the Jain's Mallinatha is the first Buddha the planet Mercury thus Wednesday, who in legend gave birth to the lunar
race. As the serpent queen she gave birth to Asita who saved the naga's and prophesied of the coming Buddha.
Mallinatha as Aparajita the Unconquered she is Durga who is invoked in battles and war, she rides a lion and has a name
Dvara-palaka Dvar-ka the gatekeeper.
Jain cosmology divides Worldly Time
cycle into two halves (avasarpiñī and
utsarpiñī) with six aras (spokes) in
each half.
The symbolism is seven in the
middle Rishabha too Su-Parzu
The word parzu is the Axe or
both sides, nine Arat's above
too Siba grandson of Yayati
'Shantinatha'.  The constellation
Pisces bottom middle left side.
Dhvaja
Nandyavarta both
on left and right,
Sriratna in the
middle. This is a
Svetambara
Symbol.
To the right the Srivatsa inside the
Triratna in Jainism  ratnatraya (triple
gems of Jainism) — the right faith
(Samyak Darshana), right knowledge
(Samyak Gyana) and right conduct
(Samyak Charitra) — constitutes the
path to liberation. These are known
as the triple gems (or jewels) of
Jainism and hence also known as
Ratnatraya. These three are
essential for the soul to move up
spiritually.  Acharya Umaswami has
written in Tattvārthasūtra that
Tattvarthasraddhanam Samyak-
darshanam (1-2),[1] which means
"Belief in substances ascertained as
they are is right faith.

Above the Hamsa goose/duck
incircled as Dharma/Cakra the Cakra
bird was and is the Hamsa bird.
Both seals have
Samvibhaga, Sam the
two lines is used twice,
the fish with two lines
Sangam as the
reciever of the Vrata
Samvibhaga.
Kunthu the
seventeenth Arhat
and twelfth
Kamadeva and the
sixth Cakravartin his
symbol is a goat.
In order of their appearance, the names, signs, and colours of the Jinas of this age are (1) Rishabhanatha (“Lord Bull”), or Adinatha
(“Lord First”), his emblem the bull, his colour golden; (2) Ajita (“Invincible One”), elephant, golden; (3) Shambhava (“Auspicious”),
horse, golden; (4) Abhinandana (“Worship”), ape, golden; (5) Sumati (“Wise”), heron, golden; (6) Padmaprabha (“Lotus-Bright”), lotus,
red; (7) Suparshva (“Good-Sided”), the swastika symbol, golden; (8) Candraprabha (“Moon-Bright”), moon, white; (9) Suvidhi, or
Pushpadanta (“Religious Duties” or “Blossom-Toothed”), dolphin or makara (sea dragon), white; (10) Shitala (“Coolness”), the shrivatsa
symbol, golden; (11) Shreyamsha (“Good”), rhinoceros, golden; (12) Vasupujya (“Worshiped with Offerings of Possessions”), buffalo,
red; (13) Vimala (“Clear”), boar, golden; (14) Ananta (“Endless”), hawk (according to the Digambara sect, ram or bear), golden; (15)
Dharma (“Duty”), thunderbolt, golden; (16) Shanti (“Peace”), antelope or deer, golden; (17) Kunthu (meaning uncertain), goat, golden;
(18) Ara (a division of time), the nandyavarta (an elaborated swastika; according to the Digambara sect, fish), golden; (19) Malli
(“Wrestler”), water jug, blue; (20) Suvrata, or Munisuvrata (“Of Good Vows”), tortoise, black; (21) Nami (“Bowing Down”), or Nimin (“Eye-
Winking”), blue lotus, golden; (22) Nemi, or Arishtanemi (“The Rim of Whose Wheel Is Unhurt”), conch shell, black; (23) Parshvanatha
(“Lord Serpent”), snake, green; (24) Vardhamana (“Prospering”), later called Mahavira (“Great Hero”), lion, golden.
In order of their appearance, the names, signs, and colours of the Jinas of this age are (1) Rishabhanatha (“Lord Bull”), or Adinatha
(“Lord First”), his emblem the bull, his colour golden; (2) Ajita (“Invincible One”), elephant, golden; (3) Shambhava (“Auspicious”),
horse, golden; (4) Abhinandana (“Worship”), ape, golden; (5) Sumati (“Wise”), heron, golden; (6) Padmaprabha (“Lotus-Bright”), lotus,
red; (7) Suparshva (“Good-Sided”), the swastika symbol, golden; (8) Candraprabha (“Moon-Bright”), moon, white; (9) Suvidhi, or
Pushpadanta (“Religious Duties” or “Blossom-Toothed”), dolphin or makara (sea dragon), white; (10) Shitala (“Coolness”), the shrivatsa
symbol, golden; (11) Shreyamsha (“Good”), rhinoceros, golden; (12) Vasupujya (“Worshiped with Offerings of Possessions”), buffalo,
red; (13) Vimala (“Clear”), boar, golden; (14) Ananta (“Endless”), hawk (according to the Digambara sect, ram or bear), golden; (15)
Dharma (“Duty”), thunderbolt, golden; (16) Shanti (“Peace”), antelope or deer, golden; (17) Kunthu (meaning uncertain), goat, golden;
(18) Ara (a division of time), the nandyavarta (an elaborated swastika; according to the Digambara sect, fish), golden; (19) Malli
(“Wrestler”), water jug, blue; (20) Suvrata, or Munisuvrata (“Of Good Vows”), tortoise, black; (21) Nami (“Bowing Down”), or Nimin (“Eye-
Winking”), blue lotus, golden; (22) Nemi, or Arishtanemi (“The Rim of Whose Wheel Is Unhurt”), conch shell, black; (23) Parshvanatha
(“Lord Serpent”), snake, green; (24) Vardhamana (“Prospering”), later called Mahavira (“Great Hero”), lion, golden.
The 9th Arhat
Suvidhi, or
Pushpadanta
(“Religious Duties” or
“Blossom-Toothed”),
dolphin or makara (sea
dragon), white
The word Sangam in the
Dravidian language is their
word for their most ancient
writings the word Sangam
was not used once in all the
writings it is a
Indoeuropean loan word
from Jainism "Sangam" for
a congregation or assembly
of monks. To the left the
Indus fish and two bars is
used for both syllable
compounds "San" and
"Gam" for Sam/gana. The
elephant is Pundaraka son
or grandson of Rishabha
the Indus Matra is the
assembly "sangam" that
happened in a deep
southern India. The sanskrit
syllable compound "Sam"
falls on the matra
Muladhara mula means root
and original. Rishabha's
"Gana-dhara" was
Pundarika the original dhara
as Mula-dhara at the first
Sam-gam.
manthara mf(%{A})n. (allied to 2.
%{mand} and %{manda} , but in some
meanings rather fr. %{math}) slow (lit.
and fig. ; often ifc. `" slow in "') , lazy ,
tardy , indolent , dull , stupid , silly
Ka1v. Ra1jat. Sa1h. &c. (%{am} ind.) ;
low , hollow , deep (as sound) W. ;
bent , curved , crooked , humpbacked
(cf. %{A} f. and %{mantharaka}) ;
broad , wide , large , bulky L. ;
tale-bearing L. ; m. a treasure or hair
or anger (= %{koza} , %{keza} , or
%{kopa}) L. ; fruit L. ; a spy L. ; an
antelope L. ; of the month Vais3a1kha
L. ; a fortress , stronghold L. ; an
obstacle , hindrance L. ; whirling L. ; a
churning-stick L. ; the mountain
Mandara W. (cf. %{manthaparvata}) ;
N. of a tortoise Hit. ; (%{A}) f. N. of a
humpbacked female slave of Bharata's
mother Kaikeyi1 (accord. to MBh. an
incarnation of the Gandharvi1
Dundubhi1 ; accord. to R. a daughter
of Virocana) ; n. safflower. kamaTha
m. (Un2. i , 102) a tortoise BhP.
Pan5cat. &c. ; a porcupine L. ; a
bamboo L. ; N. of a king MBh. ; of a
Muni ; of a Daitya ; (%{as} or %{am})
m. or n. a water-jar (esp. one made of
a hollow gourd or cocoa-nut , and
used by ascetics) L. ; (%{I}) f. a female
tortoise , a small one S3a1ntis3.
30 kAmaTha mfn. (fr. %{kamaTha}) ,
peculiar or belonging to the tortoise R.
i , 45 , 30.  
31 kamaThapati m. the king of
tortoises.
32 kambugrIva mf(%{A})n. =
%{-kaNTha} above MBh. R. &c. ; m. `"
shell-neck "'N. of a tortoise Pan5cat. ;
(%{A}) f. a shell-like neck (i.e. one
marked with three lines , cf. above) L.
kuNTha mfn. (g. %{kaDArA7di}) blunt ,
dull MBh. i , 1178 R. &c. ; stupid ,
indolent , lazy , foolish.
42 kuNThaka mfn. stupid L. ; (%{As})
m. N. of a pupil of Lun2t2aka ; (%{As})
m. pl.N. of a people (v.l. %{kuNDala})
MBh. vi , 370 VP.  
43 kuNThati to be lame or mutilated or
blunted or dulled Dha1tup. ix , 57 ; to
be lazy or stupid ib.: cl. 10.
%{kuNThayati} , to cover , conceal (cf.
%{guNTh}) Dha1tup. xxxii , 46 (cf.
%{avakuNThana})  
44 kuNThatva n. indolence , stupidity
Ra1jat. iv , 618.
45 kuNThita mfn. blunted , dulled ,
(%{a-k-} neg.) Ragh. xi , 74 ; blunt
Katha1s. lxviii , 3 ; weak , of no vigour
Ra1jat. v , 138 ; stupid ; grasped , held
, encircled W. (cf. %{vi-}.)
Saligrama Mahimai - 09 (Sacred Facts
about Saligrama - 09)
Saligrama Mahatmiyam is accepted by
everyone. Evidentially, the Conch,
Chakar, Ghada and the Lotus Flower
Forms of Saligrama confirm this more.
Bottom of page Sibi and Shantinatha
are the same person.
four on left and Sibi the
fifth on ritht.
Sibi on the left the fifth, Kunthunatha
on the right the triratna Sibi, Kunthu,
Aranatha.
Six kings follow Mallinatha
1. King Pratibuddha of
Saketpur,

2. King Chandrachhay of
Champa,

3. King Rupi of Shravasti,

4. King Shankh of Varanasi,

5. King Adi-nshatru of
Hastinapur,

6. King Jitshatru of Panchal
(Kampilyapur).
The neck is the first part that starts
with Siva the vowel "u". Siva is the
naked god the Indus glyph is Aslisha
the serpent constellation "Bhuja"for the
Digambaras. While the top Indus glyph
is Sveta constelltion Aquilia Sarasvata
the Svetambara. The lower part being
Vishnu the top Sarasvata and Brahma.
In philosophy, infinity can be attributed to infinite dimensions, as for instance in
Kant's first antinomy. In both theology and philosophy, infinity is explored in articles
such as the Ultimate, the Absolute, God, and Zeno's paradoxes. In Greek
philosophy, for example in Anaximander, 'the Boundless' is the origin of all that is.
He took the beginning or first principle to be an endless, unlimited primordial mass
(ἄπειρον, apeiron).
The Jain metaphysics and mathematics was the first to define
and delineate different "types" of infinities (see history)
, including the difference
between countably infinite and uncountably infinite - a difference which came into
being much later in modern mathematics by the work of Georg Cantor.
The Jain mathematical text Surya Prajnapti (c. 400 BC) classifies all numbers into
three sets: enumerable, innumerable, and infinite. Each of these was further
subdivided into three orders:
Enumerable: lowest, intermediate and highest
Innumerable: nearly innumerable, truly innumerable and innumerably innumerable
Infinite: nearly infinite, truly infinite, infinitely infinite

Jain theory of numbers (See IIIrd section for various infinities)
The Jains were the first to discard the idea that all infinites were the same or equal.
They recognized different types of infinities: infinite in length (one dimension),
infinite in area (two dimensions), infinite in volume (three dimensions), and infinite
perpetually (infinite number of dimensions).

According to Singh (1987), Joseph (2000) and Agrawal (2000), the highest
enumerable number N of the Jains corresponds to the modern concept of aleph-null
(the cardinal number of the infinite set of integers 1, 2, ...), the smallest cardinal
transfinite number. The Jains also defined a whole system of infinite cardinal
numbers, of which the highest enumerable number N is the smallest.

In the Jaina work on the theory of sets, two basic types of infinite numbers are
distinguished. On both physical and ontological grounds, a distinction was made
between asaṃkhyāta ("countless, innumerable") and ananta ("endless, unlimited"),
between rigidly bounded and loosely bounded infinities.
antyabha n. the last Nakshatra
(Revati) ; the last sign of the
zodiac , the sign Pisces.
The concept of Infinity first appeared in history with Jainism, in both  
philosophy and mathematics. The Indus Valley people were part of
a nation called Anatar, with a main fort on the coast called Bhogavat
(Dholivara).
The people of Bhogavat were Naga's if you take the seals of all the major
city's of the Indus they all show a striking similarity in ratio's of the deferent
pictorials images (Unicorn, elephant, tiger, etc.) it suggest a similarity in the
whole population. In the great tug-of-war at the churned of the celestial
ocean for the quest of the nectar of immortality known as Amrut, in the
Samudra Manthan, Mount Mandara was used as the rod while the snake
Vasuki (of Bhogavat )was used as the rope, while Lord Vishnu assumed
the avatar Kurma the turtle to provide a base for Mount Mandara and
prevent it from sinking. And it is Vishnu that sleeps upon the Serpent of
Infinity.The Isha Upanishad of the Yajurveda states that "if you remove a
part from infinity [pūrṇa] or add a part to infinity, still what remains is
infinity".