In the Mahabharata epic, the Heheya Kingdom (also known as Haihaya, Haiheya, Heiheya, etc.) is one of the kingdoms ruled by
Chandravanshi Kshatriya kings in the central and western India. It was ruled by the powerful Kartavirya Arjuna, who even defeated
Rakshasa Ravana. Its capital was Mahishmati on the banks of river Narmada in present-day Madhya Pradesh. They conquered many
other kingdoms of India. However, the enmity with the warrior-type Brahmins (Bhargavas) resulted in their demise. Parasurama was the
Bhargava leader under whom they were exterminated. Talajangha was an allied kingdom of Heheya, probably to the east of it.

The Haihayas (Sanskrit: हैहय) were an ancient confederacy of five ganas (clans), who claimed their common ancestry from Yadu.
According to the Harivamsha Purana (34.1898) Haihaya was the great grandson of Yadu and grandson of Sahasrajit.[1] In the Vishnu
Purana (IV.11), all the five Haihaya clans are mentioned together as the Talajanghas.[2] The five Haihaya clans were Vitihotra,
Sharyata (mentioned elsewhere in the Puranas as the descendants of Sharyati, a son of Vaivasvata Manu), Bhoja, Avanti and
Tundikera.[2] The Haihayas were native to the present-day Malwa region of Western Madhya Pradesh). The Puranas style the
Haihayas as the first ruling dynasty of Avanti.

Chaura is a village about 11 miles from Kawardha. In a temple known as Mandava Mahal (मंडवा महल) there is a long inscription on
a slab containing 37 lines, which records the construction of a Siva temple by king Ramachandra, born of the Phani or Nagavansha,
and married to Ambikadevi of the Haihaya lineage. It gives the legend of the origin of the Nagavansha, somewhat resembling that of
the Haihaya-vansha, who claim a serpent and a mare to be their original ancestors. Our record relates that a serpent got enamoured
of Mithila, the beautiful daughter of the sage Jatukarna (जाटुकर्ण).
He therefore assumed human form and had intercourse with her. Their issue was Ahiraja, who, having conquered the neighbouring
chiefs, set himself up as a king. The kings who followed him are shown in the genealogical table in the picture. Family tree is as under:
Prof. TP Verma
"Indra undertook the job and systematically analysed
and standardized it. The help of VÃyu in the process
clearly
indicates that the language was phonetically analysed. In
this process, first the spoken phrases might have been
analysed
into words then these words would have broken into
smallest units which were called aksarasâ (i.e. non-
destructible) or,
phonetically further division of which is not possible.
These, later on, were given the
name
varÃna (the coloured ones) when the process of
writing with ink came into vogue. The whole alphabet was
collectively called Aksara SamÃmnÃya and VarÃ
SamÃmnÃya (or, VarÃamÃlÃ). The initial varÃa was âa.
The
TaittirÃya PrÃtiÃÃkhya defines âvarÃaâ as â. That
describe and pronounced are varÃa beginning from âaâ.
Thus the
concept of varÃamÃlÃ, with vowels and consonants
came into existence where every
consonant was supplied with the initial vowel âaâ
because a âvarÃaâ could not be uttered without the help
of a vowel;
and was the initial vowel, other varÃas are its extension
or vikriti. This is the most scientific arrangement that has
come
to us without much modification since millennia. The
vedÃGga called â˜ÃikÃà and PrÃtiçÃkhyas are devoted
to the
phonetic analysis where the place of the origin of each
individual âaksaraâ in the mouth was determined. It is to
be noted
that in the process of speech the tongue played vital
role" .aksarasâ non-destructible.
The use of alphabetical letters for denominations is an Indian
tradition adopted by the Greeks for acceptance in local markets.

After the death of Eukratides it appears the various Greek factions
engaged in an almost continuous civil war as rival families
established themselves in different locations and fought one
another for supremacy. One king who seems to have reconstituted
a large kingdom was Menander.
Menander struck coinage on the
Indian standard,
and though the coin is still very much in the Greek
style, as it displays a diademed, helmeted bust of the king on the
obverse and Athena Alkidemos, on the reverse, the Greek legend
has migrated to the obverse and a new legend, in the local Prakrit
language and using the Kharoshthi script, has appeared on the
reverse. The legend: maharajasa tratarasa menamdrasa is a
translation of the obverse Greek legend BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ
MENANΔPOY (of King Menander, the Saviour). This coin was
issued south of the Hindu Kush mountains and has bowed to the
requirements of the Indian marketplace by adopting the reduced
weight standard and introducing a local language legend.


Menander has left behind an immense corpus of silver and bronze
coins, more so than any other Indo-Greek king. During his reign,
the fusion between Indian and Greek coin standards reached its
apogee. The coins feature the legend (Greek: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ
ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ ΜΕΝΑΝΔΡΟΥ (BASILEOS SOTEROS MENANDROU)/
Kharoshthi: MAHARAJA TRATARASA MENADRASA).
According to Bopearachchi, his silver coinage begins with a rare
series of drachms depicting on the obverse Athena and on the
reverse her attribute the owl. The weight and monograms of this
series match those of earlier king Antimachus II, indicating that
Menander succeeded Antimachus II.
Menander I Soter (Ancient Greek: Μένανδρος Α΄ ὁ Σωτήρ,
Ménandros A' ho Sōtḗr, "Menander I the Saviour"; known in Indian
Pali sources as Milinda) was an Indo-Greek King of the Indo-Greek
Kingdom (165/[3]/155[3] –130 BC) who established a large empire
in Northwestern regions of South Asia and became a patron of
Buddhism.
Menander was initially a king of Bactria. After conquering the
Punjab he established an empire in South Asia stretching from the
Kabul River valley in the west to the Ravi River in the east, and
from the Swat River valley in the north to Arachosia (the Helmand
Province). Ancient Indian writers indicate that he launched
expeditions southward into Rajasthan and as far east down the
Ganges River Valley as Pataliputra (Patna), and the Greek
geographer Strabo wrote that he "conquered more tribes than
Alexander the Great."
Large numbers of Menander’s coins have been unearthed,
attesting to both the flourishing commerce and duration of his
realm. Menander was also a patron of Buddhism, and his
conversations with the Buddhist sage Nagasena are recorded in
the important Buddhist work, the Milinda Panha ("The Questions of
King Milinda"; panha meaning "question" in Pali). After his death in
130 BC, he was succeeded by his wife Agathokleia who ruled as
regent for his son Strato I. Buddhist tradition relates that he
handed over his kingdom to his son and retired from the world, but
Plutarch relates that he died in camp while on a military campaign,
and that his remains were divided equally between the cities to be
enshrined in monuments, probably stupas, across his realm.
The use of alphabetical letters for denominations is an Indian
tradition adopted by the Greeks for acceptance in local markets.

After the death of Eukratides it appears the various Greek factions
engaged in an almost continuous civil war as rival families
established themselves in different locations and fought one
another for supremacy. One king who seems to have reconstituted
a large kingdom was Menander.
Menander struck coinage on the
Indian standard,
and though the coin is still very much in the Greek
style, as it displays a diademed, helmeted bust of the king on the
obverse and Athena Alkidemos, on the reverse, the Greek legend
has migrated to the obverse and a new legend, in the local Prakrit
language and using the Kharoshthi script, has appeared on the
reverse. The legend: maharajasa tratarasa menamdrasa is a
translation of the obverse Greek legend BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ
MENANΔPOY (of King Menander, the Saviour). This coin was
issued south of the Hindu Kush mountains and has bowed to the
requirements of the Indian marketplace by adopting the reduced
weight standard and introducing a local language legend.


Menander has left behind an immense corpus of silver and bronze
coins, more so than any other Indo-Greek king. During his reign,
the fusion between Indian and Greek coin standards reached its
apogee. The coins feature the legend (Greek: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ
ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ ΜΕΝΑΝΔΡΟΥ (BASILEOS SOTEROS MENANDROU)/
Kharoshthi: MAHARAJA TRATARASA MENADRASA).
According to Bopearachchi, his silver coinage begins with a rare
series of drachms depicting on the obverse Athena and on the
reverse her attribute the owl. The weight and monograms of this
series match those of earlier king Antimachus II, indicating that
Menander succeeded Antimachus II.
Menander I Soter (Ancient Greek: Μένανδρος Α΄ ὁ Σωτήρ,
Ménandros A' ho Sōtḗr, "Menander I the Saviour"; known in Indian
Pali sources as Milinda) was an Indo-Greek King of the Indo-Greek
Kingdom (165/[3]/155[3] –130 BC) who established a large empire
in Northwestern regions of South Asia and became a patron of
Buddhism.
Menander was initially a king of Bactria. After conquering the
Punjab he established an empire in South Asia stretching from the
Kabul River valley in the west to the Ravi River in the east, and
from the Swat River valley in the north to Arachosia (the Helmand
Province). Ancient Indian writers indicate that he launched
expeditions southward into Rajasthan and as far east down the
Ganges River Valley as Pataliputra (Patna), and the Greek
geographer Strabo wrote that he "conquered more tribes than
Alexander the Great."
Large numbers of Menander’s coins have been unearthed,
attesting to both the flourishing commerce and duration of his
realm. Menander was also a patron of Buddhism, and his
conversations with the Buddhist sage Nagasena are recorded in
the important Buddhist work, the Milinda Panha ("The Questions of
King Milinda"; panha meaning "question" in Pali). After his death in
130 BC, he was succeeded by his wife Agathokleia who ruled as
regent for his son Strato I. Buddhist tradition relates that he
handed over his kingdom to his son and retired from the world, but
Plutarch relates that he died in camp while on a military campaign,
and that his remains were divided equally between the cities to be
enshrined in monuments, probably stupas, across his realm.